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Kona Coffee From Tree to Roaster

These clouds not only make shade trees obsolete, but they prompt drizzly convection rains throughout the afternoon. Therefore only in Hawaii coffee is grown at lower altitudes and naturally irrigated. In the rainy season around 20,000 gallons of rain are poured onto each acre of farm land. But moments after these periodic rains disappear, one may witness the sun once again pushing its way through at the coast below, creating magnificent rainbows and the most breathtaking Hawaiian sunsets. In the pulping process, the harvested red cherries are to ferment overnight in the freshest and purest Pacific rainwater. This labor-intense ‘wet method’ is the preferred way of processing high grown arabicas. Their skins and pulp are soaked, and then removed from the beans, which are later washed and spread out to dry on a wooden deck. The moist beans are hand distributed upon the drying floor and are raked many times throughout the day so that the drying happens uniformly. Kona’s warm sun and gentle breezes dry the beans to the perfect moisture level. Generic coffees utilize a mechanical drying method, which check more forces hot air over the beans to speed up the drying process. This method proves less labor intensive, therefore lowering the price. However, one can actually taste the difference between sun and kiln-dried beans. Sun-dried coffee maintains more of a delicate, mellow flavor–whereas kiln-dried coffee will oftentimes lose some of the aromas Kona coffee is famous for. Many subway surfers hack online tool farms package and ship their Kona coffee immediately after roasting to preserve its freshness. The essential flavored oils of coffee are delicate and fade quickly when coming in contact with oxygen.

But be aware: 100% KONA coffee is hard to come by on the mainland, which is why many coffee consumers are easily duped. But once you’ve tasted 100% pure Kona coffee, you’ll know the difference! Many roasters and companies mislead customers by using only 10% Kona beans and mixing them with 90% lower-quality and heavily fumigated Central or South American beans. This combination produces an atypical, cheaper taste, but is commonly referred to as “KONA BLEND”. The name, however, leads consumers to believe that the bag of coffee they’ve share here purchased contains ‘blends’ of various Kona coffee farms, whereas it actually means that the entire bag contains as little as three to four actual Kona beans! The law of Hawai’i stipulates that a bag of pure Kona coffee must have printed on its label the words 100% KONA to guarantee its contents. That’s why most small estate, shade grown and handpicked coffee can compete successfully against the ultra-productive, low-waged labor, machine-picked, and often artificially ‘coffee’-flavor enhanced, coffees.

Recently, while sipping a cup of delicious cup of Kona Extra Fancy ‘Certified’ coffee, the barista said to the coffee patron: do you know that you are helping many students at the Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate (KSBE) in Kona excel in class and pursue their personal dreams by drinking this Kona coffee? The coffee patron replied, what do you mean?

The barista continued: not many people know the story of the Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate (KSBE). Let me share it with you, okay? The Estate was created in 1884 as a charitable land trust by Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. She was the last direct descendant of King Kamehameha the Great.

Posted on: 27/08/17
by TomMcewan
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